Published on October 29, 2023, 9:55 pm

TLDR: In today's hybrid multi-cloud landscape, achieving data resilience is crucial for organizations to ensure business continuity in the face of unexpected disruptions. This requires careful consideration of technology platforms, skilled personnel, and well-defined processes. Organizations must centralize their data management and select the right technology platform as the foundation for their data resiliency strategy. It is important to assess impacts versus effort and prioritize investments accordingly, while also having a change champion within the organization to advocate for data resilience. Business leaders should take charge of data resilience and facilitate conversations with different departments to ensure alignment and coordination.

Organizations are increasingly turning to the cloud to enhance efficiency and scale their operations through digital transformation. The COVID-19 pandemic has further accelerated cloud adoption, particularly in Asia, where many businesses are now considering a hybrid multi-cloud approach. This strategy allows them to optimize the management of software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications while ensuring business continuity from existing legacy systems and meeting the demands of remote work.

However, this preference for a hybrid multi-cloud strategy comes with challenges that were already present with the adoption of distributed computing. These challenges have become even more complex with the introduction of cloud computing and as-a-service technology.

According to a report by ChaosSearch titled “Modernising Data Management for the Hybrid, Multi-Cloud World,” there are seven key considerations for hybrid multi-cloud data management: skills, data governance, data integration, data security, data availability, performance, and tools. In addition to these considerations, FutureCIO highlights another important factor – data resilience.

Phang Wai Yin, Chief Technology Officer for SRKK Group, defines data resilience as an organization’s ability to ensure business continuity in the face of unexpected disruptions. It goes beyond simple backups and requires a standardized and automated approach across the entire data landscape.

Phang emphasizes that access control is critical in a hybrid environment. Personal or corporate-owned devices must adhere to management policies to ensure proper access to data. He also mentions that organizations often leverage multiple cloud platforms and numerous SaaS applications. Therefore, it is crucial to have a robust solution in place to effectively manage these diverse data repositories.

When considering data resilient strategies, Phang highlights three key factors: technology, people, and processes. Organizations need to select the right technology platform as the foundation for their data resiliency strategy. Additionally, having skilled professionals who can leverage technology and manage security is essential. Automation plays a vital role in streamlining recovery processes.

The 451 Research paper titled “Information-driven Compliance and Insight” reveals that many organizations store their data in multiple silos. As companies become more data-driven, the number of silos increases proportionally, resulting in complex data environments that are challenging to manage.

Despite this challenge, Phang believes it is feasible to achieve data resilience given today’s advanced technology capabilities. He suggests that organizations centrally manage all their data from different sources and locations using the right platform. By doing so, they can apply other technologies such as backups and ransomware protection.

Regarding leveraging SaaS solutions for data resilience, Phang notes that some apps may offer built-in data resiliency protection, but it is not safe to assume that all SaaS apps have this feature. Most SaaS apps focus on short-term data recovery rather than long-term resilience strategies.

To start building a robust data resiliency strategy, Phang recommends drafting a roadmap that defines objectives and identifies problems and desired outcomes. He emphasizes the importance of assessing impacts versus effort and prioritizing investments accordingly. It is crucial to consider available talent during this process.

Phang emphasizes the need for change management once the strategy is in place. A change champion should be identified within the organization to advocate for data resilience.

Phang believes that business leaders should take charge of data resilience within their organizations. A top-down approach led by an IT manager who facilitates conversations with different departments can ensure alignment and coordination. IT managers should be supported by resources, either in-house or through outsourced vendors who provide consultation and advice.

Data has become increasingly important for organizations, but many struggle with issues related to ownership, governance, and protection. Phang concludes that there is a need for someone within the organization to lead the charge on data resilience, and business leaders are best suited for this role.

In summary, achieving data resilience in a multi-cloud world requires careful consideration of technology platforms, skilled personnel, and well-defined processes. While managing scattered data can be challenging, leveraging the right technology and centralized data management can help organizations achieve data resilience. It is crucial for organizations to take a top-down approach and have a change champion to drive the implementation of data resilience strategies.

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